Dennis Collier Fly Illustration - Copyright Dennis Collier 2015Fly Patterns

DC's Wet-wire Buzzer – Fly Patterns

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By Dennis P. Collier

DC's Wet-wire Buzzer Recipe:

Trailing Hook: Size 2, 4 – "Owner" Cutting Point SSW or Gamakatsu Octopus
Hook: Size 6 to 14 - TMC 2499 SPBL, TMC 2487 or TMC 2488H
Thread: Black UTC 70 Ultra Thread or 8/0 Uni-thread
Beads: One Gun-Metal and one Olive "Killer Caddis" glass bead
Tail: White Polypropylene yarn
Body: Two strands Black, one strand Olive, Size "Small" UTC wire
Gill Filaments: White Polypropylene yarn
  • Step 1:

    Place a gun-metal, then an olive glass bead on the hook. You might have to crimp the barb down depending on the hook type and size in order to get the beads to slide onto the shank; or alternate the size of the beads being used. Start the tying thread right behind the first bead and build a small lump to keep the second bead from sliding up tight to the first. You'll need this small gap between the two to add the gill filament yarn and finish the fly.

  • Step 2:

    Holding the second bead, bring the thread under and behind the bead and take a couple of wraps. Tie in several strands of white Polypropylene yarn right behind the bead and on top of the hook shank. Tie in two strands of black and one stand of olive UTC wire on the near side of the hook shank. I use a pair of nail clippers to clip and even the ends of the wire prior to tying in.


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  • Step 3:

    Spin the bobbin counterclockwise to flatten out the thread (easily done with the UTC 70 denier brand) to insure a smooth underbody. Holding the Polypropylene yarn and wire in position, wrap both at the same time toward the hook bend. Stop at a position where they are just descending around the bend.


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  • Step 4:

    Advance the flat thread back to just behind the second (olive) bead. Lift the three strands of wire straight up and with a fair degree of tension insure they are tight to one another. Bring the wire around and under the hook shank and once again pull upward with tension. Proceed to wrap the wire up the hook shank being careful to insure that the wraps are staying tight to each other and the desired ribbing contrast is being uniformly achieved. Tie off the wire and using the "windmill" twisting motion, break off the wire strands. Flatten the wire stubs and take several thread wraps to cover the tie-off point. Bring the tying thread back under the second bead and into the gap between the two. Take a couple of wraps to hold in place.

  • Step 5:

    Clip off the Polypropylene yarn and create a small tail on the fly. Take the two ends of the remaining yarn between the thumb and forefinger of both hands and slide under, then up and over the far side of the two beads; allowing the tying thread and weight of the bobbin to trap the yarn between the thread and the beads. Maneuver the yarn into position at right angles to the hook and directly on top of the gap between the two beads. Make a few "X" crosses of tying thread to secure the yarn, then move the thread to a position just in front of the yarn and whip finish.

  • Step 6:

    Trim both ends of the Polypropylene yarn to create short gill filament stubs. Using your bodkin, place a drop of head cement on the underside of the beads allowing it to wick up into the thread. This will prevent the gill filaments from becoming stiff and matted from being soaked with cement.


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